Archive for the ‘Vista’ Category

Create a Password Reset Disk for Vista!

Thursday, November 25th, 2010

It is a good idea to have a Vista password reset disk on hand to have as a backup in case you forget your login password. If you are on a domain, you will not be able to use this information as your system administrator can reset your password for you. To create a password reset disk for a local user account, here’s how:

1. Insert a removable media such as a flash drive of a floppy disk
2. Go to Start
3. Select Control Panel
4. Select User Accounts and Family Safety
5. Select User Accounts
6. Select “Create a password reset disk” from the left pane
7. Follow the onscreen instructions to complete the process

Be sure to store your password reset disk in a safe place.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.

Custom Search

Add items to the Right Click and Send To option in Vista.

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

Dealing with the “Send To” folder in Vista is pretty much the same as it is in Windows XP, only the location of the folder is in a different location.

Find the Send To folder:
1. It is a hidden folder so we first need to make it visible. Click Start, Computer to open Windows Explorer. Now click Tools > Folder Options > View > put a tick next to the option Show Hidden Files and Folders and click Apply > OK.

2. To navigate to the Send To folder, double-click your main drive, usually OS (C:), > Users > and then double-click the folder for the particular user > AppData > Roaming > Microsoft > Windows > Send To.

Add Items to Send To:

1. On the File menu, point to New, and then click Shortcut.

2. Follow the instructions to create a shortcut.

OR
1. Drag and drop a Shortcut of the Item you wish to be added.

Now, when you right-click a file, and click Send To, the shortcut to the item you selected will be an option. You can create shortcuts to files, folders, applications and more.

If you dislike navigating to the Send To menu every time you want to add to it, there is an alternative method.

Create a “Send To” option in the Send To folder:
1. It is a hidden folder so we first need to make it visible. Click Start, Computer to open Windows Explorer. Now click Tools > Folder Options > View > put a tick next to the option Show Hidden Files and Folders and click Apply > OK.

2. To navigate to the Send To folder, double-click your main drive, usually OS (C:), > Users > and then double-click the folder for the particular user > AppData > Roaming > Microsoft > Windows.

3. You should now see the Send To folder, right-click it and choose the Create Shortcut option.

4. The new shortcut will be in the same location as the Send To folder. Drag and drop it into the Send To Folder.

Now anytime you want to add an item to the Send To menu, right-click the item point at Send To and choose the “Send To” option from the menu.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.




Tweak Aero’s glass borders in Windows Vista.

Friday, July 9th, 2010

The borders around system windows, such as dialog boxes and the Control Panel, are transparent in Windows Vista’s Aero interface. These borders are adjustable; you can shrink them, make them larger, and change their colors and transparency levels.
 

To make the borders larger or smaller:
 

1. Right-click the desktop and select Personalize.
 

2. Click Window Color and Appearance.
 

3. Click Open classic appearance properties for more color options.

4. From the dialog box that appears, make sure that Windows Aero is selected as the color scheme. Click the Advanced button on the right side of the dialog box. The Advanced Appearance dialog box appears.
 

5. Select Border Padding in the Item drop-down menu. To change the size of the border, type a new size for the border. (The default is 4.) Click OK, then OK again. The sizes of the borders will now change.

There’s more you can do to the borders as well. To change the border color, transparency and more, right-click the desktop and select Personalize > Window Color and Appearance.

1. Choose a color for your windows on the top of the screen, or custom-build a color by clicking Show color mixer and then moving the sliders that appear to mix your own color.
 

2. To change the transparency of window borders, move the Color intensity slider to the left to make them more translucent, and to the right to make them more opaque.
 

3. To turn off transparency, uncheck the box next to Enable transparency.
 

Have Questions?  Click Here.



Force Vista To Connect To Wireless Network When SSID Is Not Broadcasting.

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010

There is actually an easy fix to force Vista to connect to Wireless Network that is not broadcasting it’s SSID (Service Set IDentifier)

1. Just open up the Network and Sharing Center by clicking on Start, type the word network in the Start Menu search box and click on Network and Sharing Center link in the search results. Or go to Start \ Control Panel \ Network and Internet \ Network and Sharing Center.

2. In the left navigation pane, click on Manage wireless networks.

3. Then right click on your wireless network connection and select properties.

4. Click on the check box next to Connect even if the network is not broadcasting and click OK to save the change (no reboot is necessary).

5. Now when you need to connect to wireless network, when SSID is not broadcasting, Vista will make the connection all the time.

Note: As far a security goes, there is no real advantage to hiding the SSID since many programs can see your wireless device when it is not broadcasting. It does not hurt to enable it, but will not deter someone who is network savvy.

Any Questions? Click Here.

Custom Search

Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows Vista

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

Remote Desktop is a very cool tool that enables you to connect to your computer’s desktop from another computer across the network or even the Internet. The most common use for this is when people work from home and they want to run applications on their office computer–it’s typically much easier to use Remote Desktop to connect to your office computer than it is to try to connect to install every application, shared folder, and printer on your home computer. If you want to connect to a computer at your office, contact your IT department. You should let IT configure your computer and make changes to the firewall. (I have seen a few people get fired trying to do this themselves on a Company Network.)

If you want to connect to another computer in your home across your network, follow these steps (you’ll need access to an administrator account):

1. On the computer you want to connect to, click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Properties.

2. Make note of the Computer name (listed halfway down the page). Then, under Tasks, click Remote settings.

3. If all your computers are running Vista, click Allow connections only from computers running Remote Desktop with Network Level Authentication. If you have some earlier versions of Windows that you want to use to connect to this computer, click Allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop. 

4. Click Select Users.

5. In the Select Users dialog, click the Add button. Type the name of the user you want to grant access to, and then click OK. Repeat this step to add more users.

6. Click OK twice.

Windows Vista will automatically open the necessary exception in Windows Firewall. Now, you are ready to use Remote Desktop to connect to the computer from another computer.

Note: This will not work for Home Editions of Windows Vista.

Custom Search