Archive for the ‘Windows XP’ Category

Migrate From Windows XP Before Microsoft Pulls the Plug.

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

While Windows 7 is not the most recent version of Microsoft’s operating system, in my humble opinion it is one of the most secure and it is well supported by IT administrators. (Windows 8 does not include Windows XP Mode.)

No matter what the reasons are for staying with Windows XP, its users will be significantly less secure beginning April 9/2014. Vulnerabilities will be forever left unpatched, and attackers are expected to take full advantage of them.

Change is hard, both in terms of moving information and in learning a whole new OS. But if security is important to a company and it should be changing to a more recent and more secure OS is the only option.

Clean Up Your Hard Disk Weekly.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Your computer amasses temporary files over time. These files can come from any number of sources, with the web being one of the largest offenders. After a while, these temporary files will slow down your computer.

About once every week, you should run the Windows Disk Cleanup utility to clear your PC of these temporary files. The Windows Disk Cleanup tool requires user input to complete its designated task. For this reason, it is recommended that, when setting up the utility to run automatically (as described in the next paragraph), you choose a time when you are typically on the computer so you can provide this input.

When using the Create Basic Task Wizard, select the Open the Properties dialog for this task when I click Finish check box. This allows you to access additional properties related to the task. On the Settings tab, select the Run task as soon as possible after a scheduled start is missed check box to ensure that the task starts the next time you are logged on to your computer.

Schedule Disk Cleanup to run automatically:

Windows 7
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Task Scheduler. If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task. This opens the Create Basic Task Wizard.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows Vista
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Administrative Tools, and then click Task Scheduler. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows XP
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. Click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Under or pick a Control Panel icon, click Scheduled Tasks.
4. In the Scheduled Tasks window, double-click Add Scheduled Task.
5. In the Scheduled Task Wizard, click Next.
6. Scroll down to Disk Cleanup in the list of Applications, click it (to highlight it), and then click Next.
7. Under Perform this task, click Weekly, and then click Next.
8. Set the time and day of the week you would like to run Disk Cleanup. For best results, choose a time when you’re typically at your computer so you can provide any required input. Click Next.
9. Type your password in both the Enter the password and Confirm password boxes, and then click Next.
10. Click Finish.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.

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Using Password Phrases For Better Security.

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009

 

 

Did you know that Windows supports using passwords of up to 127 characters? I don’t use passwords anymore, and I haven’t for years. I’ve switched to using password phrases instead.

 

Why do I use password phrases?

 

- Why would you want to remember a password like 2%d7as$d when you could just remember a sentence like “are bandwidth charges on the horizon” or “Send Me Your Computer Questions” or “I hate my old car!” or “Holy Molly not another charge for publishing

 

- You can use uppercase, lowercase, special characters, or even spaces… but you are using them in context, which makes it much more natural to remember.

 

- Post-it notes on your monitor are not secure. Sorry.

 

- Even the most efficient forms of password cracking, using pre-computed rainbow tables, will never be able to crack a password with 20 or more characters.

 

These days, windows passwords can be cracked in no more than a few seconds. If somebody can get physical access to your machine, they can boot off one of the hacker tool cds available all over the internet, and they will typically have your password in seconds, if they know what they are doing.

 

Even with brute force cracking, there is no possible way that you can crack a password that long. Even if somebody had the super computing power to do so, hopefully you change your password every few months or so.

 

It may be difficult to use password phrases on other operating systems, or especially on websites, because they don’t properly handle spaces in the password, or have a small password length limit. One of the tricks that I usually do is use a password phrase without the spaces, if I possibly can.

 

So go change your password now.


HOLD THAT RESTART IN XP.

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

A lot of Windows XP users may experience a sudden and unexpected shut down and restart, which is not very convenient if you happen to be in the middle of something. This is caused by a setting in Control Panel and by default XP will automatically reboot in the event of a system failure.

Of course when something drastic goes wrong the PC may well be unusable but there is a small chance it may recover or at least leave you with enough functionality to save your work.

At any rate you have nothing to loose by switching this facility off and you can find it by going to Start > Control Panel > System. Select the Advanced tab, under Startup and Recovery click the Settings button and deselect ‘Automatically Reboot (Restart) on System Failure’, click OK and exit.

TURN YOUR PC INTO A TIMELAPSE VIDEO RECORDER.

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

 If you are using Windows XP and you have a webcam then you have the makings of a simple time-lapse video security system. It’s ideal for keeping watch on your home or property, or capturing the wildlife visiting your garden. All you have to do is download a free utility from Microsoft — it’s part of the PowerToys suite — called Webcam Timershot.

Once installed you can program it to take and save a still image at preset intervals, from once a second to once every 999 days. The pictures are saved in a file location of your choice as *.jpg images, in a choice of resolutions, and you can view them using Paint or the image viewer of your choice.

http://download.microsoft.com/download/whistler/Install/2/WXP/EN-US/TimershotPowertoySetup.exe

For More Tips Like The Above.

http://www.internetfixes.com/question_and_answer/index.htm