Having Problems Accessing The Bios Setup?

March 16th, 2011

You may need to access the BIOS setup utility for a number of reasons like managing memory settings, configuring a new hard drive, changing the boot order, resetting the BIOS password, etc.
Entering BIOS is actually very easy once you determine which key or combination of keys on your keyboard to press to access BIOS.
Follow the easy steps below to access the BIOS setup utility on your computer.

Here’s How:

1. Turn on your PC or restart it if it’s already on.
2. Watch for a “entering setup” message in the first few seconds after turning on your computer. This message varies greatly from computer to computer and also includes the key or keys you need to press to enter BIOS.

Here are some common ways you might see this BIOS access message:
• Press [key] to enter setup
• Setup: [key]
• Enter BIOS by pressing [key]
• Press [key] to enter BIOS setup
• Press [key] to access BIOS
• Press [key] to access system configuration

3. Quickly press the key or keys instructed by the previous message to get into BIOS.

Note: You may need to press the BIOS access key several times to enter BIOS. Don’t hold the key down or press it too many times or your system may error or lock up. If that happens, just restart and try again.

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You Control which Files or Folders are Shared with your Homegroup.

March 8th, 2011

When you created or joined your homegroup, you selected the libraries you wanted to share with other people in the homegroup. Libraries are initially shared with Read access, which means that you can look at or listen to what’s in the library, but you can’t make changes to the files in it. You can adjust the level of access later, and you can exclude specific files and folders from sharing.

To prevent a library from being shared.
1. Open HomeGroup by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, typing homegroup in the search box, and then clicking HomeGroup.
2. Clear the check box for each library you don’t want shared, and then click Save changes.

To prevent specific files or folders from being shared.
1. Click the Start button, and then click your user name.
2. Navigate to the file or folder you want to exclude from sharing, and then select it.
3. Do one of the following:

a. To prevent the file or folder from being shared with anyone, in the toolbar, click Share with, and then click Nobody.

b. To share the file or folder with some people but not others, in the toolbar, click Share with, click Specific people, select each person you want to share with, and then click Add. Click Share when you are finished.

c. To change the level of access to a file or folder, in the toolbar, click Share with, and then select either Homegroup (Read) or Homegroup (Read/Write).

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.




Clean Up Your Hard Disk Weekly.

March 2nd, 2011

Your computer amasses temporary files over time. These files can come from any number of sources, with the web being one of the largest offenders. After a while, these temporary files will slow down your computer.

About once every week, you should run the Windows Disk Cleanup utility to clear your PC of these temporary files. The Windows Disk Cleanup tool requires user input to complete its designated task. For this reason, it is recommended that, when setting up the utility to run automatically (as described in the next paragraph), you choose a time when you are typically on the computer so you can provide this input.

When using the Create Basic Task Wizard, select the Open the Properties dialog for this task when I click Finish check box. This allows you to access additional properties related to the task. On the Settings tab, select the Run task as soon as possible after a scheduled start is missed check box to ensure that the task starts the next time you are logged on to your computer.

Schedule Disk Cleanup to run automatically:

Windows 7
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Task Scheduler. If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task. This opens the Create Basic Task Wizard.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows Vista
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Administrative Tools, and then click Task Scheduler. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows XP
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. Click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Under or pick a Control Panel icon, click Scheduled Tasks.
4. In the Scheduled Tasks window, double-click Add Scheduled Task.
5. In the Scheduled Task Wizard, click Next.
6. Scroll down to Disk Cleanup in the list of Applications, click it (to highlight it), and then click Next.
7. Under Perform this task, click Weekly, and then click Next.
8. Set the time and day of the week you would like to run Disk Cleanup. For best results, choose a time when you’re typically at your computer so you can provide any required input. Click Next.
9. Type your password in both the Enter the password and Confirm password boxes, and then click Next.
10. Click Finish.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.

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Defragmenting a Drive in Windows 7.

January 6th, 2011

Defragmenting your hard drive instructing Windows to rearrange files on a hard drive so that the various parts of a file all sit next to one another rated as a Big Deal. Windows didn’t help automate running defrags, so few people bothered. As a result, drives started to look like patchwork quilts with pieces of files stored randomly. On the rare occasion that a Windows user ran the defragmenter, bringing all the pieces together could take hours and the resulting system speed-up rarely raised any eyebrows.

Windows 7 changes that by simply and quietly scheduling a disk defragmentation to run every week. You don’t need to touch a thing.

Windows 7 doesn’t run automatic defrags on solid state drives which is to say, flash memory drives that don’t have any moving parts. (You probably don’t have one yet, but they’re becoming more common every year.) Solid state drives don’t need defragmentation. They also have a finite lifespan, so there’s no need to overwork the drives with a senseless exercise in futility.

If you’re curious about how your computer’s doing in the defrag department, choose Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmenter. Disk Defragmenter gives you a full report allowing you to make scheduling changes if you so desire. You can also choose which drives you want to defrag.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.

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