Posts Tagged ‘Windows Vista’

Clean Up Your Hard Disk Weekly.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Your computer amasses temporary files over time. These files can come from any number of sources, with the web being one of the largest offenders. After a while, these temporary files will slow down your computer.

About once every week, you should run the Windows Disk Cleanup utility to clear your PC of these temporary files. The Windows Disk Cleanup tool requires user input to complete its designated task. For this reason, it is recommended that, when setting up the utility to run automatically (as described in the next paragraph), you choose a time when you are typically on the computer so you can provide this input.

When using the Create Basic Task Wizard, select the Open the Properties dialog for this task when I click Finish check box. This allows you to access additional properties related to the task. On the Settings tab, select the Run task as soon as possible after a scheduled start is missed check box to ensure that the task starts the next time you are logged on to your computer.

Schedule Disk Cleanup to run automatically:

Windows 7
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Task Scheduler. If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task. This opens the Create Basic Task Wizard.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows Vista
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Administrative Tools, and then click Task Scheduler. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows XP
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. Click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Under or pick a Control Panel icon, click Scheduled Tasks.
4. In the Scheduled Tasks window, double-click Add Scheduled Task.
5. In the Scheduled Task Wizard, click Next.
6. Scroll down to Disk Cleanup in the list of Applications, click it (to highlight it), and then click Next.
7. Under Perform this task, click Weekly, and then click Next.
8. Set the time and day of the week you would like to run Disk Cleanup. For best results, choose a time when you’re typically at your computer so you can provide any required input. Click Next.
9. Type your password in both the Enter the password and Confirm password boxes, and then click Next.
10. Click Finish.

These tutorials are a one-person effort. Please donate if you find them useful.

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Tweak Aero’s glass borders in Windows Vista.

Friday, July 9th, 2010

The borders around system windows, such as dialog boxes and the Control Panel, are transparent in Windows Vista’s Aero interface. These borders are adjustable; you can shrink them, make them larger, and change their colors and transparency levels.
 

To make the borders larger or smaller:
 

1. Right-click the desktop and select Personalize.
 

2. Click Window Color and Appearance.
 

3. Click Open classic appearance properties for more color options.

4. From the dialog box that appears, make sure that Windows Aero is selected as the color scheme. Click the Advanced button on the right side of the dialog box. The Advanced Appearance dialog box appears.
 

5. Select Border Padding in the Item drop-down menu. To change the size of the border, type a new size for the border. (The default is 4.) Click OK, then OK again. The sizes of the borders will now change.

There’s more you can do to the borders as well. To change the border color, transparency and more, right-click the desktop and select Personalize > Window Color and Appearance.

1. Choose a color for your windows on the top of the screen, or custom-build a color by clicking Show color mixer and then moving the sliders that appear to mix your own color.
 

2. To change the transparency of window borders, move the Color intensity slider to the left to make them more translucent, and to the right to make them more opaque.
 

3. To turn off transparency, uncheck the box next to Enable transparency.
 

Have Questions?  Click Here.



Having a problem seeing the BIOS access message?

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

1. See a picture instead of a message? Your computer may be configured to show your computer’s logo instead of important BIOS messages. Press Esc or Tab while the logo is showing to remove it.

2. See the message but didn’t catch which key to press? Some computers start too quickly to see the BIOS access message. If this happens, press the Pause/Break key on your keyboard to freeze the screen during startup. Press any key to “un-pause” your computer and continue booting.

3. Having troubles pausing the startup screen? If you’re having problems pressing that pause button in time, turn on your computer with your keyboard unplugged. You should receive a keyboard error which will pause the startup process long enough for you to see the keys necessary to enter BIOS!

4. Tried everything and still can’t get in? Some PCs with both PS/2 and USB connections are configured to only allow USB input after the POST. This means that if you’re using a USB keyboard, it could be impossible to access BIOS. In that case, you’d need to connect an older PS/2 keyboard to your PC to access BIOS.

5. Accessing the BIOS is independent of any operating system on your computer because the BIOS is part of your motherboard hardware. It doesn’t matter if your PC is running Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Linux, Unix, or no operating system at all – any instructions for entering the BIOS setup utility will be the same.

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Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows Vista

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

Remote Desktop is a very cool tool that enables you to connect to your computer’s desktop from another computer across the network or even the Internet. The most common use for this is when people work from home and they want to run applications on their office computer–it’s typically much easier to use Remote Desktop to connect to your office computer than it is to try to connect to install every application, shared folder, and printer on your home computer. If you want to connect to a computer at your office, contact your IT department. You should let IT configure your computer and make changes to the firewall. (I have seen a few people get fired trying to do this themselves on a Company Network.)

If you want to connect to another computer in your home across your network, follow these steps (you’ll need access to an administrator account):

1. On the computer you want to connect to, click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Properties.

2. Make note of the Computer name (listed halfway down the page). Then, under Tasks, click Remote settings.

3. If all your computers are running Vista, click Allow connections only from computers running Remote Desktop with Network Level Authentication. If you have some earlier versions of Windows that you want to use to connect to this computer, click Allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop. 

4. Click Select Users.

5. In the Select Users dialog, click the Add button. Type the name of the user you want to grant access to, and then click OK. Repeat this step to add more users.

6. Click OK twice.

Windows Vista will automatically open the necessary exception in Windows Firewall. Now, you are ready to use Remote Desktop to connect to the computer from another computer.

Note: This will not work for Home Editions of Windows Vista.

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How to Share Files or a Folder in Windows Vista.

Thursday, May 13th, 2010

Beside Public folder sharing, you can share files or a folder on your computer. You do this by setting sharing permissions and security permission. Sharing permissions can be granted to an individual or to a group of users on the same network. For example, you might allow some people to only view your shared files, while allowing others to both view and change them.

By default, everyone has read only permission when you enable the sharing. So you need to assign change and read permissions if you want some one to save and modify the files. If you receive Access is denied error, you may want to check the permissions in the Security tab which is main cause.

To share files from a folder on your computer, please follow these steps:

1. Locate the folder you want to share.

2. Right-click on it and select Properties, and then Sharing

3. In the File Sharing dialog box, do one of the following:

- Type the name of the person you want to share files with, and then click Add.

- Click the arrow to the right of the text box, click the person’s name in the list, and then click Add.

- If you don’t see the name of the person you want to share files with in the list, click the arrow to the right of the text box, and then click Create a new user to create a new user account so that you can share files with the person using this account.

The name of the person or group that you selected appears in the list of people you want to share files with.

4. Under Permission Level, click the arrow next to the permission level for that person or group, and then do one of the following to set sharing permissions:

- Click Reader to restrict the person or group to viewing files in the shared folder.

- Click Contributor to allow the person or group to view all files, add files, and change or delete the files that they add.

- Click Co-owner to allow the person or group to view, change, add, and delete files in the shared folder.

Note: If you are sharing a file instead of a folder, there is no option to set the permission level to Contributor.

5. After you are finished choosing the users or groups you want to share files with, click Share. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

6. After you receive confirmation that your folder is shared, you may send a link to your shared files to the people you are sharing them with, so they know the files are shared and how to access them. Do one of the following:

- Click E mail Link to automatically open a Windows Mail e mail message with the link to your shared files.

- Manually copy and paste the link displayed on this screen into an e mail message. Right-click the link and click Copy Link. Then open a new e mail message and paste in the link. You might want to do this if you don’t use Windows Mail as your e mail program.

7. Click Done.

8. Click Security tab make sure the users and groups have necessary rights. If not, add them accordingly.