Posts Tagged ‘Windows XP’

Clean Up Your Hard Disk Weekly.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Your computer amasses temporary files over time. These files can come from any number of sources, with the web being one of the largest offenders. After a while, these temporary files will slow down your computer.

About once every week, you should run the Windows Disk Cleanup utility to clear your PC of these temporary files. The Windows Disk Cleanup tool requires user input to complete its designated task. For this reason, it is recommended that, when setting up the utility to run automatically (as described in the next paragraph), you choose a time when you are typically on the computer so you can provide this input.

When using the Create Basic Task Wizard, select the Open the Properties dialog for this task when I click Finish check box. This allows you to access additional properties related to the task. On the Settings tab, select the Run task as soon as possible after a scheduled start is missed check box to ensure that the task starts the next time you are logged on to your computer.

Schedule Disk Cleanup to run automatically:

Windows 7
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Task Scheduler. If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task. This opens the Create Basic Task Wizard.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows Vista
1. Open Task Scheduler: Click the Start button, click Administrative Tools, and then click Task Scheduler. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the Action menu, and then click Create Basic Task.
3. Type a name for the task and an optional description, and then click Next.
4. To select a schedule based on the calendar, click Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or One time, and then click Next.
5. Specify the schedule you want to use, and then click Next.
6. Click Start a program, and then click Next.
7. Click Browse, and, in the File name box, type cleanmgr.exe, click Open, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.

Windows XP
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. Click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Under or pick a Control Panel icon, click Scheduled Tasks.
4. In the Scheduled Tasks window, double-click Add Scheduled Task.
5. In the Scheduled Task Wizard, click Next.
6. Scroll down to Disk Cleanup in the list of Applications, click it (to highlight it), and then click Next.
7. Under Perform this task, click Weekly, and then click Next.
8. Set the time and day of the week you would like to run Disk Cleanup. For best results, choose a time when you’re typically at your computer so you can provide any required input. Click Next.
9. Type your password in both the Enter the password and Confirm password boxes, and then click Next.
10. Click Finish.

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Having a problem seeing the BIOS access message?

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

1. See a picture instead of a message? Your computer may be configured to show your computer’s logo instead of important BIOS messages. Press Esc or Tab while the logo is showing to remove it.

2. See the message but didn’t catch which key to press? Some computers start too quickly to see the BIOS access message. If this happens, press the Pause/Break key on your keyboard to freeze the screen during startup. Press any key to “un-pause” your computer and continue booting.

3. Having troubles pausing the startup screen? If you’re having problems pressing that pause button in time, turn on your computer with your keyboard unplugged. You should receive a keyboard error which will pause the startup process long enough for you to see the keys necessary to enter BIOS!

4. Tried everything and still can’t get in? Some PCs with both PS/2 and USB connections are configured to only allow USB input after the POST. This means that if you’re using a USB keyboard, it could be impossible to access BIOS. In that case, you’d need to connect an older PS/2 keyboard to your PC to access BIOS.

5. Accessing the BIOS is independent of any operating system on your computer because the BIOS is part of your motherboard hardware. It doesn’t matter if your PC is running Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Linux, Unix, or no operating system at all – any instructions for entering the BIOS setup utility will be the same.

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Prevent System Restore Points Being Lost When Dual Booting Vista With Windows XP.

Thursday, April 1st, 2010

If you are running Windows XP and Windows Vista as a dual boot machine, you may have noticed that, after booting to Windows XP and then booting back to Windows Vista, the system restore points in Windows Vista disappear. This, apparently, is caused by Windows XP’s shadow copying and, according to Microsoft, will not be fixed as it would require extensive alterations to the code of Windows XP in order to repair the problem.

While there is no real update fix for this problem which, incidentally, can be extremely annoying, there is a workaround – well, actually two workarounds, as follows.

Workaround 1

This first workaround relies upon the Bitlocker encryption feature. By enabling Bitlocker Encryption either via an onboard TPM chip or a removable USB pen drive you can, effectively, stop Windows XP from removing system restore points from Windows Vista.

Workaround 2

Another option, which is simpler if you don’t want to go down the Bitlocker Encryption route is to boot into Windows XP and, using a freeware utility called TweakUi hide the Windows Vista partition from Windows XP. Because XP cannot see the Windows Vista partition it cannot remove the system restore points.
The end result of both these workarounds is that you can move from Windows Vista to Windows XP and back again without losing the precious System restore points.



REVIVE AN OLD TIMER — NETMEETING IN XP.

Saturday, December 13th, 2008

Those of you who have been around Windows for a while may remember NetMeeting, a really handy utility that lets PC users communicate over the Internet using live text, webcam and ‘whiteboard’. Sadly it fell into disuse — it was a swine to configure on a dial-up connection — and when Windows XP came along it had apparently disappeared. It’s well worth getting to know once again, especially if you have a webcam and broadband. You and a webcam-equipped friend can set up a private one-to-one link simply by inputting each other’s IP addresses.

NetMeeting is included with Windows XP but it has been hidden away. To install it simply go to Run on the Start menu and type ‘conf’ (without the quotes), then follow the prompts. Set up your webcam first, (Tools > Options > Video) and when you can see yourself in the video screen (click the Start Video button) you can link up to your friend by clicking Call > New Call and enter their IP address in the To box. Your friend should do the same (they enter your IP address) and all being well the two-way video link should be established.

Launch Windows Control Panel Applets From The Run Command.

Sunday, October 19th, 2008

As important as Windows Explorer is for navigating around the file system, the Control Panel is the central point of Windows Operating Systems for configuring various system and program options.

But to access the Control Panel, you need to navigate through the Start menu or create a shortcut on your desktop.

Just like executable or programs, Control panel applets can easily be launched from the run command. While there is no difference with opening items from the Control Panel, it can save you several steps from needing to open the control panel.

 

[Windows logo key]+R opens the Run command

 

For example, to launch Add or Remove Programs applet, just type appwiz.cpl in the run command field and click OK.

If you access an applet in the Control Panel frequently, you can also create shortcuts on your desktop or add it to the quick launch on the taskbar.

To locate all the applets, just open Windows Explorer and navigate to %System%\System32 folder. Then sort by file type and scroll down to all files with Control Panel Item (or you can search in the %System%\System32 for *.cpl).

Below is a list of the most typical applets you will find in the Control Panel. Depending on what you have installed on your system and if you are running XP or Vista, your list may be different.

access.cpl – Accessibility Options
appwiz.cpl – Add or Remove Programs
desk.cpl – Display Properties
firewall.cpl – Firewall
hdwwiz.cpl – Add Hardware Wizard
inetcpl.cpl – Internet Explorer Properties
intl.cpl – Regional and Language Options
irprops.cpl – Wireless Link (Infrared)
joy.cpl – Game Controllers
jpicpl32.cpl – Java Control Panel
main.cpl – Mouse Properties
mmsys.cpl – Sounds and Audio Devices Pro Properties
ncpa.cpl – Network Connections
netsetup.cpl – Network Setup Wizard
nusrmgr.cpl – User Accounts
odbccp32.cpl – ODBC Data Source Administrator
PLUGIN~2.CPL – Java Plug-in Control Panel
powercfg.cpl – Power Options Properties
sysdm.cpl – System Properties
telephon.cpl – Phone and Modem Options
timedate.cpl – Date and Time Properties
wscui.cpl – Windows Security Center
wuaucpl.cpl – Automatic Updates

Now, instead of navigating through the Start menu, you can easily access individual Control Panel items easily from the Run command…and save yourself a few mouse clicks.