Post Your Computer Questions

Site Index   |  Quick Index   |  New Tips   |  MS Windows   |  MS Office   |   Newsletter   |   Q&A  |   More Tips  |    

Tips Download   |   Donations   |   Customer Support   |   Registry Tips   |   Weekend Windup |   IE 6.0   |   IE 7.0  |   Help   |   Suggestions

 Windows XP Run Commands | Computer Questions. Microsoft Access Databases | Computer Terms | New Home Material Estimating Spread Sheets!

  Windows XP Remote Desktop Setup One! | 57 Vista Run Commands | Windows XP Remote Desktop Setup Two!

Internet Fixes Windows XP And More News Letter!  Issue

1. These Services May Be Safely Stopped In Windows XP!
2. Improve XP Performance By Changing Display Options!
3. Using Web Folders To View And Transfer Files!
4. Do You Prefer More Speed or More Room?
5. Allowing A Program To Communicate Through Windows Firewall!
6. Adjusting How Often To Update Pages When Going Online!
7. Add A Web Site To The List of Trusted Or Restricted Sites!
8. You Want To Activate Content Advisor? OK. This Is How!
9. Edit The Registry Safely In Windows XP!
10. Test TCP/IP Connections By Using The Ping And Net View Commands In XP Pro!
11. Easily Create A Partition On Your Hard Disk With Windows XP!
12. Copy Outlook Express Mail Files to a Backup Folder!
13. Using IP Security Policy Management In Windows XP!
14. Share A Folder On A Network With Windows XP Pro!
15. Outlook Express User Files In Windows XP!
 
 

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Using Password Phrases For Better Security.

 

150 Windows XP Run Commands!

57 Vista Run Commands

Have Computer Related Questions?  Ask Me Direct or Post Your Question on the New FAQ Section Of The Site.

            
  NAVIGATION
 

My Newsletter

Message Boards
Post Your PC Question.
Tips Package Download
Site Index
Quick Index

 


 

 

1. These Services May Be Safely Stopped In Windows XP!

 

Sure, services can easily be stopped, started, or disabled in XP, but determining which services to stop or disable to improve system performance can be confusing. The long list of services and their associated dependencies can seem overwhelming. Disabling or stopping some services can crash your system. Disabling or stopping the running service can also cause problems with other services or programs that are dependent on it to function properly. To make things easier, the following of services may be disabled or stopped without causing problems for your system:

 

Alerter - Notifies selected users and computers of administrative alerts

 

Clipbook - Enables ClipBook Viewer to store information and share it with remote computers

 

Computer Browser - Maintains an updated list of computers on the network and supplies this list to computers designated as browsers

 

Fast User Switching - Provides management for applications that require assistance in a multiple user environment

 

Indexing Service - Indexes contents and properties of files on local and remote computers

 

Messenger - Transmits Net Send and Alerter service messages between clients and servers

 

Net Logon - Supports pass-through authentication of account logon events for computers in a domain

 

NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing - Enables an authorized user to access this computer remotely by using NetMeeting over a corporate intranet

 

Remote Desktop Help Session Manager - Manages and controls Remote Assistance

 

Remote Registry - Enables remote users to modify registry settings on this computer

 

Routing and Remote Access - Offers routing services to businesses in local area and wide area network environments

 

Server - Supports file, print, and named-pipe sharing over the network for this computer

 

SSDP Discovery Service - Enables discovery of UPnP devices on your home network

 

TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper - Enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) service and NetBIOS name resolution

 

Telnet - Enables a remote user to log on to this computer and run programs, and supports various TCP/IP Telnet clients, including UNIX-based and Windows-based computers

 

Upload Manager - Manages synchronous and asynchronous file transfers between clients and servers on the network

 

Wireless Zero Configuration - Provides automatic configuration for the 802.11 adapters

 

Workstation - Creates and maintains client network connections to remote servers

Top

2. Improve XP Performance By Changing Display Options!

 

Windows XP includes many visual features that do not directly add to or improve the functionality of the product. Examples of these features include the shadow behind the mouse cursor and menus, and animated windows.

 

The Problem

These visual effects may look cool, but they don’t actually increase a user’s productivity. And, in some cases, they can be counterproductive. On many computers, these visual features cause negative side effects and considerably slow system performance. For example, a system may appear extremely slow while opening the Start menu or other program menus. This slowdown is typically caused by the graphics card and un-optimized drivers.

 

The Fix

There are several ways to work around this problem. The first option is to check the manufacturer’s Web site for updated drivers. If this doesn’t help, it’s best to either purchase a better graphics card or turn off the visual effects that slow down the computer.

 

To turn off the visual effects:

 

1. Open Control Panel.

2. Double-click the System icon.

3. Click Performance And Maintenance if using the Web view.

4. Click System on the next screen.

5. Open the Advanced tab in the System Properties dialog that appears.

6. Click the Settings button under the Performance section.

 

The Performance Options dialog will open, listing all the visual effects that can possibly slow down the system. Users can manually enable or disable individual effects or use one of the predefined settings.

 

Additional settings are located in the Display Properties dialog box. To view these settings:

 

1. Right-click on the desktop and select Properties.

2. Click the Effects button on the Appearance tab. A new dialog box with six additional visual settings will open.

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Top

3. Using Web Folders To View And Transfer Files!
 
Using Web Folders to view and transfer files, folders, and other information to a Web server offers you a more secure computing experience which is something you should always be looking for.
 
Web Folders transfer information over a network connection to a remote Web server, but can use the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol to help protect information as it is being transmitted. (It is not a requirement for Web Folders to use SSL, but it is recommended.) Using SSL with Web Folders requires that the Web server also supports SSL.
 
Web Folders also support Windows authentication (a method for helping to verify the identity of a user), which can help protect your password when you are logging on to a Web server that also supports Windows authentication.
 
Side Notes!
- If a Web server supports the SSL protocol, the Internet address for the server will begin with https:// instead of http://.
- It is recommended that you enable Windows Firewall when transferring files using Web Folders. To open Windows Firewall, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Windows Firewall.
- A firewall helps protect your computer by preventing unauthorized users from gaining access to it through a network or the Internet.

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!


Top

4. Do You Prefer More Speed or More Room?
 
 If you tend to go online a lot and have ample space on your computer, you might want to increase the size of your Temporary Internet Files folder. Why? Because Internet Explorer will read already-viewed files from the cache first rather than take the time to download the same page from the Web, thus saving you time and money.
 
 To change the size of your cache:
 1. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options. The Internet Options box should open to the General tab.
 2. On the General tab, in the Temporary Internet Files section, click the Settings button. This will open the Settings box.
 3. In the Settings box, under Amount of disk space to use, you can slide the bar to the right to increase the amount of disk space used by your Temporary Internet Files folder.
 4. Click OK, and then click OK again.
  

Very Busy Web Pages!

Function Keys, F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6, F7, F8, F9, F10, F11, F12
140 Windows XP Run Commands.
Vista Run Commands.

Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, A-K
Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, L-P
Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, Q-Z

Computer Motherboard And Chipset Drivers.

I try and keep up on the latest Virus Alerts.

Drivers Index.

Top

5. Allowing A Program To Communicate Through Windows Firewall!
 
To help provide security for your computer, Windows Firewall blocks unsolicited requests to connect to your computer. Because the firewall restricts communication between your computer and the Internet, you might need to adjust settings for some programs that prefer an open connection to the Internet. You can make an exception for these programs, so that they can communicate through the firewall.
 
Risks of allowing exceptions!
 
Each time that you allow an exception for a program to communicate through Windows Firewall, your computer is made more vulnerable. To allow an exception is like poking a hole through the firewall. If there are too many holes, there is not much wall left in your firewall. Unknown intruders often use software that scans the Internet looking for computers with unprotected connections. If you have many exceptions and open ports, your computer can become a victim of these intruders.
 
To help decrease your security risk if you allow exceptions:
- Only allow an exception when you really need it.
- Never allow an exception for a program that you don't recognize.
- Remove an exception when you no longer need it.
 
Allowing exceptions despite the risk!
 
Sometimes you might want someone to be able to connect to your computer, despite the risk—such as when you expect to receive a file sent through an instant messaging program, or when you play a multiplayer game over the Internet.
 
For example, if you are exchanging instant messages with someone who wants to send you a file (a photo, for example), Windows Firewall will ask you if you want to unblock the connection and allow the photo to reach your computer. Or, if you want to play a multiplayer network game with friends over the Internet, you can add the game as an exception so that the firewall will allow the game information to reach your computer.
 
To allow unsolicited requests to connect to a program on your computer, use the Exceptions tab in Windows Firewall. If the program or service that you want to allow an exception for is not listed on the Exceptions tab, you can add it by clicking Add Program. If you do not find the program on the list of programs to add, click Browse to search for it.
 
To add a program to the exceptions list.
You must be logged on to this computer as an administrator to complete this procedure.
 
1. Open Windows Firewall.
2. On the Exceptions tab, under Programs and Services, select the check box for the program or service that you want to allow, and then click OK.
 
If the program (or service) that you want to allow is not listed:
 
1. Click Add Program.
2. In the Add a Program dialog box, click the program that you want to add, and then click OK. The program will appear, selected, on the Exceptions tab, under Programs and Services.
3. Click OK.
 
If the program (or service) that you want to allow is not listed in the Add a Program dialog box:
 
1. In the Add a Program dialog box, click Browse, locate the program that you want to add, and then double-click it. (Programs are usually stored in the Program Files folder on your computer.) The program will appear under Programs, in the Add a Program dialog box.
2. Click OK. The program will appear, selected, on the Exceptions tab, under Programs and Services.
3. Click OK.
 
If you still do not find the program, you can open a port instead. A port is like a small door in the firewall that allows communications to pass through. To specify which port to open, on the Exceptions tab, click Add Port. (When you open a port, remember to close it again when you are done using it.)
 
Adding an exception is preferable to opening a port because:
- It is easier to do.

- You do not need to know which port number to use.
- Adding an exception helps provide security, because the firewall is only open while the program is waiting to receive the connection.
 
Advanced options!
Advanced users can open ports for, and configure the scope of, individual connections to minimize opportunities for intruders to connect to a computer or network. To do this, open Windows Firewall, click the Advanced tab, and use the settings under Network Connection Settings.

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Top

6. Adjusting How Often To Update Pages When Going Online!
 
While it's true that the more files you can load from your hard disk, the faster your browsing speed, it's also true that those pages on the Web might have changed since being stored on your computer. You might not want to miss fresh content just to save a little time. Fortunately, in addition to the size of the cache, you can also customize how often Internet Explorer checks the Web for updated content.
 
First you will need to go to the Internet Explorer Settings box:
1. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options. The Internet Options box should open to the General tab.
2. On the General tab, in the Temporary Internet Files section, click the Settings button. This will open the Settings box.
3. In the Settings box, there are four ways to check for newer versions of pages that are stored in the Temporary Internet Files folder:
 
- Every visit to the page: You're assured of the most current content, but it's slower to browse previously viewed pages.
- Every time you start Internet Explorer: On your first visit to a page, Internet Explorer will check for new information, but not on subsequent visits in the same browsing session.
- Automatically: Internet Explorer will check automatically for any new content.
- Never: This option is fastest, but you could be viewing old content from the cache. To refresh the page, press the F5 button on your keyboard—this will connect you to the page on the Web and download new information to the Temporary Internet files folder.
 
Try several combinations of these options and cache size to find the best fit for your needs. You may need to use the settings for a few days to fully gauge how they are working.

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!

Top

7. Add A Web Site To The List of Trusted Or Restricted Sites!
 
Internet Explorer sets up the Trusted zone with a low security level to make it easier for you to do such things as download software without prompting. Add a site to this zone only if you trust that it would never cause harm to your computer. On the other hand, the Restricted zone imposes the highest security level for sites you deem untrustworthy; when you visit these sites, Internet Explorer will prompt you at every turn.
1. Go the Web site you want to add to a zone.
2. Press ALT+D to select the Web address, and press CTRL+C to copy it to the Windows Clipboard.
 
This saves you from having to type it later.
3. On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options.
4. Click the Security tab, and then click the security zone where you want to add the site: Local intranet, Trusted sites, or Restricted sites.
 
Because all sites are by default already in the Internet zone, you cannot add Web sites to it.
5. Click the Sites button.
6. In the Add this Web site to the zone box, press CTRL+V to paste in the Web address.
7. Click the Add button.
 
Side Note: If Internet Explorer asks for confirmation, you may be trying to add a site that is not secure. Internet Explorer will accept only sites to the Trusted list that make a secure connection—for example, secure banking or shopping sites. To identify such a site, look for https:// in the Web address.
 
If you want to add an unsecured Web site (for example, a site that does not have https:// in the Web address), click to remove the check in the Require server verification box.
 
Be careful! Only do this for Web sites whose content you trust 100 percent.
8. If you want to add more sites to this zone now, you can go back to step 6 and type any additional Web addresses into the Add this Web site to the zone box, and then click the Add button.
9. Click OK twice.
 
Tip: To see the list of Web sites you’ve added to Trusted and Restricted sites, on the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. Click the Security tab, and then click either Trusted sites or Restricted sites. Click the Sites button to see the list. When you’re finished, click Cancel twice.

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Top

8. You Want To Activate Content Advisor? OK. This Is How!
 
To activate Content Advisor, you set yourself up as the Supervisor of Content with a password.

 

Don't lose it! I Get Many Requests for ways of removing a Content Password and I Don’t Answer These!
 

1. On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options.
2. Click the Content tab, and click the Enable button.
3. In the Content Advisor box, click the General tab, and then click the Create Password button.
4. In the Create Supervisor Password box, type the password you want to use.
5. In the Confirm Password box, type the same password again.
 
Internet Explorer requires this to make sure you haven't made a typing error.
 
6. In the Hint box, type a hint to help you remember your password, and then click OK.
 
Make sure the hint is one your child won't know the answer to. If you can't come up with something, leave it blank. (But then, of course, you're on your own if you forget the password!)
 
7. Click OK in response to the message about Content Advisor, and then click OK once more.
 
Now every time you bump into Content Advisor's protective walls, you'll need to type the supervisor password to get through.
 
Be careful! Don't lose your password. To turn off Content Advisor or make any changes whatsoever, you'll need your supervisor password. Store it in a child-proof place away from your computer.

Top

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!

9. Edit The Registry Safely In Windows XP!
 
Windows XP has a vast number of configuration dialogs, but some adjustments can be performed only by directly editing the Registry. Frequently, tips involving Registry tweaks include stern warnings to back up the Registry before making any change. The Windows XP Backup applet can back up the Registry along with other elements of the System State, but the resulting data file can occupy hundreds of megabytes. You're better off saving a system restore point each time you're about to edit the Registry. Better still, you can use Regedit to back up only the Registry keys that will be changed.
 
Click on Start | Run and enter Regedit to launch the Registry editor. To back up an individual key you plan to edit, navigate to the key and right-click on it. Choose Export from the menu, and save the key to a REG file. Open the REG file in Notepad and insert a few comment lines that describe the source and purpose of the tweak. (To create a comment line, simply put a semicolon at the start of the line.)
 

Now go ahead and make all the changes to Registry keys and values specified by the tip you're applying. Any time you add a new key or value, make a note of it with another comment line in the REG file. When you're done, save the REG file and close Notepad.
 
If later you want to undo this Registry tweak, just double-click on the REG file and confirm that you want to add it to the Registry. This will restore any deleted keys or values and will restore the original data for any values whose data was changed. Note that this will not remove new keys or values that were added; that's why you need to make comments about such changes.
 
Right-click on the REG file and choose Edit, which will open it in Notepad. Check for comments about keys or values that were added, and if you find any, use Regedit to delete them. You can delete the REG file itself once you've completed this process.
 
Caution Using the Registry Editor incorrectly can cause data loss or even operating system failure. Be careful when directly editing the registry.
 
Go To The Following Address To Learn More About Backing Up The Registry!
http://internetfixes1.brinkster.net/registry_tips/registry.htm


 

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Top

10. Test TCP/IP Connections By Using The Ping And Net View Commands In XP Pro!
 
1. To test TCP/IP connectivity by using the ping command, use the display of the ipconfig command to ensure that your network adapter is not in a Media disconnected state.
 

2. Open Command Prompt, and then ping the desired host using its IP address.
 
If the ping command fails with a Request timed out message, verify that the host IP address is correct, that the host is operational, and that all of the gateways (routers) between this computer and the host are operational.
 
3. To test host name resolution by using the ping command, ping the desired host using its host name.
 
If the ping command fails with an Unable to resolve target system name message, verify that the host name is correct and that the host name can be resolved by your DNS server.
 
4. To test TCP/IP connectivity by using the net view command, open Command Prompt, and then type net view \\ComputerName. The net view command lists the file and print shares of a computer using Windows XP by establishing a temporary connection. If there are no file or print shares on the specified computer, the net view command displays a There are no entries in the list message.
 
If the net view command fails with a System error 53 has occurred message, verify that ComputerName is correct, that the computer using Windows XP is operational, and that all of the gateways (routers) between this computer and the computer using Windows XP are operational.
 
If the net view command fails with a System error 5 has occurred. Access is denied. message, verify that you are logged on using an account that has permission to view the shares on the remote computer.
 
To further troubleshoot this connectivity problem, do the following:
 
- Use the ping command to ping ComputerName.
 
If the ping command fails with an Unable to resolve target system name message, then ComputerName cannot be resolved to its IP address.
 
- Use the net view command and the IP address of the computer using Windows XP, as follows:
 
net view \\IPAddress
 
If the net view command succeeds, then ComputerName is being resolved to the wrong IP address.
 
If the net view command fails with a System error 53 has occurred message, the remote computer might not be running the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks service.
 
Side Notes:
- To open a command prompt, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.
 

- If the ping command is not found or the command fails, you can use Event Viewer to check the System Log and look for problems reported by Setup or the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) service.
 

- The ping command uses Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Echo Request and Echo Reply messages. Packet filtering policies on routers, firewalls, or other types of security gateways might prevent the forwarding of this traffic.
 

- This procedure assumes that you are using only the TCP/IP protocol. If you are using other protocols, such as the NWLink IPX/SPX/NetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol, net view commands might work correctly even when there are problems resolving names and making connections with TCP/IP. A net view connection is attempted with all installed protocols. If the net view connection with TCP/IP fails, a net view connection using NWLink IPX/SPX/NetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol is attempted.
 

- The ipconfig command is the command-line equivalent to the winipcfg command, which is available in Windows Millennium Edition, Windows 98, and Windows 95. Windows XP does not include a graphical equivalent to the winipcfg command, however, you can get the equivalent functionality for viewing and renewing an IP address by opening The Network Connections, right-clicking a network connection, clicking Status, and then clicking the Support tab.
 
Used without parameters, ipconfig displays the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for all adapters.
- To run ipconfig, you must open the command prompt and then type ipconfig.
- To open Network Connections, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.
- The IPX/SPX protocol is not available on Windows XP 64-Bit Edition.

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!

Top

11. Easily Create A Partition On Your Hard Disk With Windows XP!
 
If you've moved up from Windows 95 or 98 to Windows XP, one big thing you'll notice is that creating new partitions doesn't have to be done from the command line any more. Windows XP makes it easy to create a new partition using the graphical disk management tool. Here's how:
 
1. Turn off your computer and install your new hard disk. It's unlikely that you have any unpartitioned space on which to create a new partition on the drive already in the machine, so you'll need to add a new drive. New drives typically don't come preformatted, so you'll need to create your own partitions and format them.
 
2. Start your computer and logon as an administrator. Click Start and then click the Run command. In the Open text box type: diskmgmt.msc and click OK.
 
3. A Wizard will appear when the Disk Management console opens. Go through the Wizard's steps and allow it to initialize the new disk, but do not allow the Wizard to convert the disk from basic to dynamic.
 
4. You will see, on the left side of the console, disk icons that represent "Disk 0", "Disk 1," etc. Your new disk should be the one with the highest number. The size of the disk should be listed, and the word "Unallocated" should be just under the size. Right click where it shows the size of the disk and click the New Partition command.
 
5. Click Next on the New Partition Wizard Welcome page.
 
6. On the Select Partition Type page, click on both of the options and read the Descriptions. We'll assume here you're creating a primary partition. Select Primary partition and click Next.
 
7. On the Specify Partition Size page, type in the size of the partition. Depending on what you want to use the disk for, you might want to create more than one partition. Type in the size of the new partition in the Partition size in MB text box and click Next.
 
8. On the Assign Drive Letter or Path page, you can bind the partition to a drive letter or mount it in an empty NTFS folder. In this example, you'll do it the old fashioned way and assign the partition a new drive letter. Select the drive letter and click Next.
 
9. You need to format the partition to use it. Always use NTFS unless you need to allow other operating systems on the same machine to access the drive. You can use the defaults, or customize the Allocation unit size based on the types of applications you want to run on the disk. Click Next.
 
10. Click Finish.
 
Note: You'll see the drive being formatted. You can use the partition after the formatting is complete.

Very Busy Web Pages!

Function Keys, F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6, F7, F8, F9, F10, F11, F12
140 Windows XP Run Commands.
Vista Run Commands.

Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, A-K
Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, L-P
Hardware And Software Vendor Phone List, Q-Z

Computer Motherboard And Chipset Drivers.

I try and keep up on the latest Virus Alerts.

Drivers Index.

Top

12. Copy Outlook Express Mail Files to a Backup Folder!
 
To make a backup copy of your Outlook Express e-mail message files:
1. On the Tools menu, click Options.
2. On the Maintenance tab, click Store Folder.
3. Select the folder location, and then press CTRL+C to copy the location.
4. Click Cancel, and then click Cancel again to close the dialog box.
5. Click Start, and then click Run.
6. In the Open box, press CTRL+V, and then click OK.
7. On the Edit menu, click Select All.
8. On the Edit menu, click Copy, and then close the window.
9. Right-click any empty space on your desktop, click New, and then click Folder.
10. Type mail backup for the folder name, and then press ENTER.
11. Double-click the Mail Backup folder to open it.
12. On the Edit menu, click Paste.
13. Close the Mail Backup window.

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!

Top

13. Using IP Security Policy Management In Windows XP!
 
You might need to be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group in order to perform some tasks.
 
Internet Protocol security (IPSec) is a key line of defense against internal, private network, and external security attacks. IPSec uses cryptographic security services to provide data integrity, data authentication, data confidentiality, and replay protection for TCP/IP traffic. IPSec behavior is controlled using an IPSec policy that you configure and assign using the IP Security Policy Management snap-in.
 
To install an IP Security Policy Management snap-in:
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type mmc, and then click OK.
3. On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in.
4. Click Add, and then double-click IP Security Policy Management.
5. Follow the instructions on your screen.

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

Top

14. Share A Folder On A Network With Windows XP Pro!

 

You already have a Shared Documents folder in the root of My Computer. The easiest thing to do is put stuff you want to share in this folder.

 

Here's what to do if you want to share a different folder.

 

1. Right-click the folder you want to share and click Properties.

2. Go to the Sharing tab.

3. Either tell it you understand the risks, or walk through the wizard explaining the risks.

4. Select to "Share this folder on the network."

5. Only select "Allow users to share your files" if your Wi-Fi security is enabled.

6. Click OK.

When you open your Network Places, you'll see the shared folder and get prompted to log in.


Top

Your Continued Donations Keep Internet Fixes Running!

Check Out My New Blog!

15. Outlook Express User Files In Windows XP!
 
In Windows XP, the Outlook Express user files, including *.wab and *.dbx files, are by default marked as hidden. To view these files in Explorer, you must enable Show Hidden Files and Folders under:
 
Start | Control Panel | Folder Options | View.
 
Opening the store root in Windows Explorer reveals a collection of *.dbx files. These are the files where all your messages are actually stored. The Folders.dbx file is the master index of the entire store. Likewise, the *.dbx files for the OE default mail folders will also be created if missing. If one of these folders stops working properly, deleting the corresponding *.dbx file will usually solve the problem. (Be sure to move the contents of those folders in OE before you attempt this). Special attention should be paid to the Inbox, Sent Items and Deleted Items folders. It is easy for these folders to grow extremely large. OE is not a dedicated database program, and can have problems with very large files, making them prone to corruption and data loss. For this reason alone, you should not use the Inbox to store messages. Instead, create other folders for storing mail and leave the Inbox for incoming mail. You should also make cleaning and compacting the Sent Items folder part of your regular maintenance
 
You can avoid a large Deleted Items folder by configuring OE to empty the Deleted Items folder automatically upon exiting. Do this under Tools| Options| Maintenance. If you choose to disable that, be sure to include Deleted Items in your regular maintenance.

Top

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

This Package Has 100 Vista Tips Included!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

 

 

 


 


  Site Feedback

Hit Counter

Let me know if you need anything else.

Did this Article Give you the Information You Were Looking For?

 YES!  NO!

 

Main Site Navigation:

|Windows 7 Questions. |Vista Questions. |Windows XP Home and Pro Questions. |Internet Explorer 8.0 |Internet Explorer 7.0 |Printer Problems. |Outlook Express 6.0 |

|Windows Mail. |Moderator Tips! |Firefox |Home Networking Problems!! | Function Keys, F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6, F7, F8, F9, F10, F11, F12 | Windows Live Essentials 2011.

 

You Can also get all these tips plus more in one Package including 100 Vista Tips!

 

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

Page 4

Page 5

Page 6

Page 7

Page 8

 

See The 11 Tip Package That You Should Print And Keep Close To Your Computer! 

100 Vista Tips!

This One Also Comes With The Standard Tips Package!  2 Downloads!

  My Blog!

Close To 400 More XP Tips.  If you Can't Find The Answer Here just Click Here!
Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8


Newsletter Signup
   |   Search   |   Windows Versions   |   Office Versions   |  
Forum |   Readers Q&A   |   Tips In Full Graphics   |   Tips Download    

 Site Navigation:
Donations
   |   Support   |   Registry Tips   |   Weekend Windup   |   PC Questions |   IE 6.0   |   IE 7.0   |   Outlook Express 6.0   |   PC Help
Virus Info
   |   Computer Drivers   |   Hardware Info.   |  
Your Suggestions |   IE 7.0 Install  |   Database Downloads   |   Home  |  Computer Terms  

|   57 Vista Run Commands   |   Windows XP Run Commands  |   Microsoft Access Databases  |

Windows XP Remote Desktop Setup One! |New Home Material Estimating Spread Sheets! Windows XP Remote Desktop Setup Two!

All products mentioned are registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective companies.
Questions or problems regarding this web site should be directed to the
Webmaster.
Copyright © 1999-2011  Internet Fixes. All rights reserved.      
Legal Disclaimer

This Site Is Part Of The Internet Fixes Network!